Graft your Sock Toe with Kitchener Stitch

Grafting the Toe

Grafting or Kitchener Stitch is an excellent way of finishing the toe in a smooth neat way. But if you prefer, you can miss out the grafting stage and gather the remaining 8 stitches, pull them tight, and sew in the end firmly.

Set Up for Grafting

To graft you need to do a set up stage first.

  • Insert the threaded tapestry needle into the first knit stitch on the front double pointed needle (the dpn nearest to you) as if to purl, then pull it through and leave the stitch on the dpn.
  • Then, insert the tapestry needle into the first knitted stitch on the back dpn as if to knit, and pull the tapestry needle through leaving the stitch on the needle.

Grafting Stage 1 – Front Needle

  • Insert the tapestry needle into the first stitch on the front dpn as if to knit and slip the stitch off the dpn
  • I normally pull the yarn through this stitch fully.
  • Then, insert the tapestry needle into the next stitch on the front dpn as if to purl, and pull it through and leave this stitch on the double pointed needle.

Grafting Stage 2 – Back Needle

  • Insert the tapestry needle into the first knit stitch on the back double pointed needle as if to purl, and slip this stitch off the dpn.
  • Then, insert the tapestry needle into the next stitch on the back double pointed needle as if to knit, and pull the needle through leaving the stitch on the dpn.
  • Continue repeating grafting stage 1 and then stage 2 until you have grafted all the stitches together. It is easy to use your tapestry needle to adjust the tension of the grafted stitches if they are slightly loose or tight.

Finishing At the Toe

In most patterns, they end with sentences such as ‘sew in any loose ends’. As this is a step by step series on knitting your first sock, I am covering every stage in detail and I’m not making any assumptions as to how advanced the knitter is who is knitting their first sock. When I was first knitting socks, I used to google surprisingly simple questions, and I now take the answers that I found out for granted.

  • Take the needle through to the inside of the sock. Take care not to prick your finger or to take the needle through both sides of the sock.
  • Turn the sock inside out.
  • It is important to be careful you don’t sew both sides of the sock together when you are sewing in the loose end. I have done this more than once! Check for this before you cut off your yarn at the end.
  • Start by slipping the needle through several of the ‘reverse stocking stitch bumps’ at the shaped edge.
  • Then you ‘sew’ across the row of bumps working ‘with’ the bumps rather than against them, ‘up’
  • and ‘down’ with the flow of the bumps.
  • Take care not to pull the yarn too tight which causes the stitches on the right side to look distorted.
  • Finally, slip the needle through several of the bumps along the other shaped edge, pull the needle through.
  • Cut the end leaving about 2 cm which prevents the end from migrating through to the right side.
About Nicolette

Comments

  1. Marjorie Clark says:

    would like instructions to graft sock toe for a left hand knitter

  2. Aha! This is where I started my first Kitchner Stitch comment and lost it.
    Couldn’t find my way back to this particular blog.
    I left a comment on the blog for the #4 series of ” How to Knit Your First Sock” ending with the grafting method. Sorry–I’m a senior and have these problems with computers.
    Do so love the series! Joyce in Utah

    • Hi Joyce

      I did a quick a quick cut and paste job from the 4th part of my How to Knit Your First Sock to create this post. I’m forever linking to the 4th part to show how to do the Kitchener Stitch when I’m writing new posts and I thought it would be easier for readers if I didn’t make them search through the whole post to find the grafting bit!
      So pleased you find the series useful. Many thanks for your comment. Nicolette

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