Kerry Bog Village

We intended to spend the day travelling around half of the Ring of Kerry but it wasn’t long before we were turning in to visit the Kerry Bog Village.

Kerry Bog Village

The Gypsy caravan was amazing. It really is hard to see how a whole family could live in the tiny space even though it was empty inside. We are all so used to having a lot of personal space and lots of belongings within our comfortable modern space! On the other hand, they had the freedom of an open road and the sky and stars above them. But, gosh, I do love a nice hot electric shower!

Kerry Bog Village

The Turf Cutter’s Dwelling with an old flagstone floor. Hand cut turf was the main way of heating the cottage through the year. Cooking and baking was done over the turf fire which was kept alight throughout the day and night.

Kerry Bog Village

An old cast iron sewing machine and iron. These sewing machines were made to last and my mother-in-law has a beautiful old treadle Singer sewing machine in perfect working order that she uses. Most people made clothes and bedding for their whole family and a sewing machine was incredibly useful making these tasks so much quicker.

Kerry Bog Village

Kerry Bog Village

The Thatcher’s Cottage was bigger and more spacious than many of the other cottages with a mezzanine level for two additional iron framed beds. All the beds had attractive quilts on them.

Kerry Bog Village

The cottage was furnished with better quality furniture and had more windows and extra light coming into the rooms. You paid more tax for having bigger windows so it was a luxury to have a brighter home.

Kerry Bog Village

Kerry Bog Village

The irish wolfhound in the photo is 11 years old which is very old for this breed of dog who normally live an average of 7 years. It is an ancient Irish breed of dog who was originally used for hunting deer, wolves and boar.

Kerry Bog Village

The hearth truly was at the heart of the old Irish cottage, as the fire was used to keep the house warm, to do all the baking and cooking as well as for heating water for tea or for washing clothes and children.

Kerry Bog Village

The Stable Dwelling, was a very small cottage, as you walked in through the door on the left side (open to the main room) was the stable side where a pig or cow would have been kept. Heat from the animals would have warmed the house.

Kerry Bog Village

The Old Forge was very dark inside with a cobble stone floor. The walls were lined with implements for blacksmithing – he would have worked as a farrier as well as making wheels for wagons and gates. It was well ventilated with windows, a set of bellows beside a hot fire with a large chimney above and wide double doors, big enough for a small wagon or horses to be able to be brought inside.

Kerry Bog Village

The Kerry Bog Ponies are a native breed. They are a small skinny breed of horse that is light on its feet, can easily walk across the bog carrying home turf from the bog, and is fast and strong for all its size!

The Kerry Bog Village was an interesting visit. We enjoyed walking in and out of all of the different cottages. Looking at the ponies and donkeys. It is a small village, created in a similar way to the larger Folk Park in County Down and Irish American Folk Park in County Tyrone.

About Nicolette

Comments

  1. Hi Nicolette,
    I enjoyed the historical places you visit as a lot of items in the homes are a lot like
    historical homes in the US. Especially the open fireplace and cast iron pots.
    I have visited the Irish America Museum in County Tyrone–my
    Wallace ancestors immigrated to the American colonies
    from Tyrone in 1767, 9 years before our American Revolution. Much of the country side in Tyrone and round about
    looks very much like our Southern states country side–guess that’s why they settled there.
    I love history, historic places and Family History–and of course
    knitting, a historic art and craft.
    Thank you for making your site so enjoyable in a variety of ways.
    Joyce in Utah

    • Hi Joyce, you have a wonderful long family history in the US. I’ve visited the Ulster American Folk Park in Tyrone a few times over the years. They’ve done a good job of showing the difference between Ireland, the trip on the ship (which must have been terrible for those on board), and what life was like in the US when the Irish settlers arrived. I had intended visiting the park this year while my nieces are over visiting, but with our holiday in Kerry and Connemara, and later in August we’ll be visiting Brittany as we’re taking my nieces back home after their visit, so it hasn’t been possible for this year! Many thanks for your interesting comment, Nicolette

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